What do you get for the billionaire who has everything? How about a vanity TLD?

By John Yunker,

I love this story in CircleID about how the Hong Kong billionaire Richard Li has registered the generic top-level domain .richardli.

I have no idea what he paid but the going rate on the application is around $100,000.

The official explanation for this purchase is to “protect intellectual property.” But I’d say owning one can be a heck of a lot of fun.

Now that Richard owns the domain, he can set up his own email account; how about me@richardli?

Now I just have to drum up enough money to register .yunker before these folks beat me to it.

 

Now you can register the Korean equivalent of .com: 닷컴

By John Yunker,

Earlier this year Verisign, the registry that manages the .com and .net domains, began rolling out the localized Japanese equivalent of .com: .コム.

Today, Verisign adds another language to the mix, with the rollout of the Korean versions of both .com (.닷컴 ) and .net (.닷넷).

Screen Shot 2016-05-16 at 10.11.54 AM

This is sunrise period of registration, which is limited to trademark owners. The landrush period begins on August 16th.

Here are details on how these new localized domain names will function:

korean_IDNs

PS: The landrush for the Japanese equivalent of .com begins today!

 

Web Globalization Leaders in Life Sciences

By John Yunker,

webglobalization_lifesciences

As life sciences companies broaden their global sights to include new and emerging markets, their global (and mobile) websites have not always kept pace.

SDL recently commissioned a report in which I benchmarked a select group of 25 life sciences websites:

  • Abbott
  • Abbvie
  • Amgen
  • Astra Zeneca
  • Baxter
  • Bayer
  • Beckman
  • Coulter
  • Becton Dickinson
  • Boston Scientific
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • Edwards Life Sciences
  • Eli Lilly resenius
  • Gilead Sciences
  • Hill-Rom
  • Johnson & Johnson/Janssen
  • Medtronic
  • Merck
  • Perkin Elmer
  • Pfizer
  • Sanofi
  • Sciex
  • Smith & Nephew
  • St. Jude Medical
  • Stryker

From languages to localized content to usability, this report highlights those companies that have done the very best at taking their websites global. In addition, this report provides valuable best practices from which companies across all industries can benefit.

You can request a free copy of the report here.

And I will be presenting from the report on May 25th via webinar, also free. You can register here.

I hope you can join!

 

 

 

Adobe: The best global consumer technology website of 2016

By John Yunker,

For the 2016 Web Globalization Report Card, we studied the following 15 consumer technology websites:

  • Adobe
  • Apple
  • Canon
  • Dell
  • HP
  • HTC
  • Lenovo
  • LG
  • Microsoft
  • Nikon
  • Panasonic
  • Samsung
  • Sony
  • Toshiba
  • Xiaomi

The consumer technology sector includes many of the most globally successful companies. So it’s no surprise that the top four companies are also in the top 25 list: Adobe, Microsoft, Samsung and Nikon.

Adobe emerged on top even though it is not the language leader; Microsoft leads with 43 languages.

But Adobe leads in global navigation and consistency. Shown below is the Japanese home page, which shares the same global template with most other country websites:

adobe_jp

 

In the footer is the global gateway link, as indicated by the map icon. I recommend upgrading this icon into the header to improve findability. I also recommend using a generic globe icon.

adobe_gateway_footer

Clicking on the map icon brings up an effective global gateway menu overlay. Notice how the country/region names are in the local languages. I call this a “universal” global gateway because it can be used across all localized websites (instead of supporting a separate menu for each local website):

adobe_gateway

Adobe also makes good use of geolocation to help determine which localized website users prefer. For example, if a user in Ecuador inputs Adobe.com, he or she is taken to the .com English-language website but presented with this overlay that lets the user know there is also a Spanish-language site available.

adobe_geolocation

This way, users remain in control but also made aware of localized websites. To learn more about geolocation strategies, check out Geolocation for Global Success.

Adobe also one of a growing number of companies that make use of user-facing machine translation to allows users to self-translate content. Here is a screen shot from the user forums. While the execution could be more user friendly, the feature itself is something more companies should be supporting (and many are currently testing):

adobe_forum_translation

On a separate note, I wanted to highlight the mobile home page for Nikon.

Notice the globe icon in the header. Nikon is one of the few consumer tech websites to include a global gateway link in the header of its mobile website.

nikon_mobile

To learn more, check out the 2016 Web Globalization Report Card.

American Express: The best global financial services website of 2016

By John Yunker,

For the 2016 Web Globalization Report Card, we studied 9 financial services websites:

  • Allianz
  • American Express
  • Axa
  • Citibank
  • HSBC
  • Marsh
  • MasterCard
  • Visa
  • Western Union

American Express emerged on top with support for an impressive 41 languages; it most recently added Bosnian. Allianz finished in second place in regards to languages.

The AmEx home page, shown here, features a visible global gateway link well positioned in the header:

amex_home

You’ll notice that flags are not used on the global gateway menu, which is smart. American Express also includes “speech bubbles” to indicate that the site has been localized. I’m not sure these icons are needed. Instead, simply present the localized country names in the local languages. And as for those countries that are not yet localized, leave those country names in English, since the websites are still only in English.

amex_gateway

AmEx supports most lightweight mobile website of the financial services sector. It comes in at 800 kilobytes, which is more than five times lighter than the MasterCard and Visa mobile websites.

amex_mobile

Now, there is still plenty of room for improvement. While the global website is responsive, the global gateway page is NOT responsive, which is a significant oversight. And a number of localized websites still rely on legacy, non-responsive templates. This isn’t unique to AmEx as many financial services companies are not globally consistent.

Overall, American Express is well ahead of the competition when it comes to website globalization.

But the competition isn’t sitting still. It’s worth noting that both MasterCard and Visa launched newly designed and responsive websites over the past year. And that Visa has been aggressively adding languages, expanding its global reach.

I expect this year to see a significant increase in languages supported across the financial sector.

 

 

 

What’s the most multilingual website?

By John Yunker,

I often point to Wikipedia as one of the most multilingual websites on the Internet.

Which is a major reason why Wikipedia finished in third place in the 2016 Web Globalization Report Card.

But Wikipedia is not the most multilingual website.

For that, I’d have to point toward the Jehovah’s Witnesses website.

As only partially illustrated by the screen grab below, the Jehovah’s Witnesses site supports nearly 600 languages, up from 400 in 2010.

jw_gateway.700

In comparison, Wikipedia supports only 271 languages.

Google supports only 125 languages.

(It feels odd to write “only” and “125 languages” in the same sentence)

I should be clear that I’m using a liberal definition of “supporting a language.” Most of the languages supported by the Jehovah’s website are represented by very little content — about a dozen or so web pages. This is also static content — the stuff that doesn’t require monthly or even annual updates. Nevertheless, it’s hard to deny that 600 languages is a notable achievement.

Here’s a sample page in Marathi:

jehova's witness global

 

I want to highlight the global gateway: The menu includes all available languages (displayed in the local languages). And, equally important, a global gateway icon is well positioned in the upper right corner of every web page, as shown below:

Jehovah's Witness global gateway

 

I prefer a globe icon as the one used here says “translation” more than global gateway.

So how does the JW.org website compare with other religion websites?

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints supports an impressive 115 languages, up from 40 a few years ago.

And the website has made great strides in improving its global gateway. Shown below is the language menu:

LDS global gateway

 

And here is the globe icon used to highlight the gateway:

lsd_gatewaydetail2

 

The Holy See supports a mere 10 languages, which, to its credit, is an increase from five years ago.

Holy See global gateway

 

I also visited the Christian Scientist website, which has made progress over the years–up to about 20 languages.

Christian Science home page

 

I reviewed a handful of other religion websites but found nothing beyond English and Spanish.

While I doubt anyone is going to come close to challenging Jehovah’s Witnesses soon in languages, I’d love to see more competition. So if I’ve overlooked any website, please let me know.

You can now register the Japanese equivalent of .com: .コム

By John Yunker,

verisign_japanese_com

And so it begins.

Verisign, the registrar that manages .com domains, has begun its rollout of non-Latin .com equivalents, beginning with Japanese:

Japanese .com domain

Now, if you don’t have a Japanese domain name, slapping .コム to the end of your company’s name probably doesn’t make much sense from a branding perspective (though absolutely from an intellectual property perspective).

But more and more companies DO have Japanese domains names (or should).

And these companies will be registering this domain, if they haven’t already.

The official land rush begins May 16, 2016. So get ready!

Japanese is only just the beginning.

 

 

 

 

Say hello to the first .google domain

By John Yunker,

domains.google

Google announced the launch of domains.google. today, not a new service but a newly “domained” service.

I think it’s fitting that the first public use of .google is applied to its domains business.

The question is: What other business lines will begin using .google?

And what will .google ultimately resolve to? A search window?

 

  Category: Google, gTLDs
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Chinese marathoners suffer from lack of translation

By John Yunker,

soap china

According to People’s Daily, a number of runners in a South China marathon suffered from more than simply lack of hydration.

Try lack of translation.

The bar of soap shown above was included in each runner’s swag bag — apparently a number of runners thought they were energy bars. Yes, folks, translation does matter!

And even in English, that package does not look like soap. After 26 miles I might have done the same thing.

  Category: China, Translation
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